2018 Session Descriptions

 

Concurrent Session A
Wednesday, 7/25/2018
8:30AM-5:00PM

A1: How Does Trauma-Informed Care Fit Into The Risk, Need & Responsivity (RNR) Framework

There is increasing discussion in criminal justice circles on Trauma Informed Care.  The people we serve are overrepresented regarding complex trauma. Informed and careful consideration must be given regarding how we view, understand and intervene appropriately so that we can be responsive to the needs that come with trauma impacted individuals, while advancing our practices to further increase principles of effective correctional programming. 

Eva Kishimoto, DCSW, CSAC, LCSW, Curriculum and Special Population Project, Director, University of Cincinnati Corrections Institute, Cincinnati, OH

A2: Addiction And The Family: Using A Strength-Based Model For Treatment & Recovery

Living with an addicted person is not a spectator sport.  To one extent or another addiction affects the entire family, regardless of whether it is a parent or adolescent family member who is addicted. Using a systems perspective and a strength-based model, this workshop will focus on the impact of addiction on the family, strategies for individual and family intervention, and suggestions to facilitate family transitions and recovery.  Additional topics will include, using family rituals to facilitate change, helping family members to utilize emotional, social, and moral intelligences to encourage recovery, developing a family continuing care plan, and an appreciation for gender differences in the addiction process and in recovery.  

Robert Ackerman, PhD, Professor Emeritus and Previous Director, Mid-Atlantic Addiction Research and Training Institute; Co-Founder of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics; Chair of the Advisory Board and Former Editor of Counselor: The Magazine for Addiction and Behavioral Health Professionals, Hilton Head, SC

A3: Alcohol, Drugs, Sex, Intrigue, Gambling, Eating, Rage, And More: A Comprehensive Model Of Addiction Treatment

This largely experiential session presents the cutting-edge model for understanding addictions, compulsions, trauma, and a range of other psychological disorders. Using group psychotherapy, adventure therapy, and psychodrama, we will translate the concept of addiction as an attachment disorder and key principles of twelve-step recovery into powerful clinical interventions and a guideline for treatment. 

Shelley Korshak Firestone, MD, CGP, FAGPA, Medical Director, Chicago Psychotherapy and Psychiatry; Adjunct Professor: Department of Psychiatry, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

A4: Change Leader Academy - The NIATx Approach

The Change Leader Academy (CLA) session is for anyone interested in leading a change initiative or improving service delivery in their organization. This 1-day session trains change leaders in the NIATx model of process improvement– a structured, team-based approach to change management/implementation for organizations both large and small. Attendees will learn the key principles and action steps in selecting a change project; setting a clear project aim; engaging staff in the change process; and achieving measurable, sustainable improvements. NIATx believes effective change management is learned by “doing” and “sharing” successes and challenges. Therefore, following the CLA workshop, participants will commit to carrying out a 3-month change project in their organization – focusing on one of three areas: Medication Assisted Treatment; Recovery Oriented Systems of Care; or Access & Retention in treatment. They will then receive a free technical assistance call with a NIATx coach and three monthly peer-learning conference calls with other change leaders working on similar projects. There is no cost for this follow-up technical assistance. Many past CLA participants have led projects to reduce no-shows and wait times; increase admissions and retention in treatment; improve hand-offs between levels of care; expand services; implement evidence-based practices; and many other measurable improvements. 

Scott Gatzke, Director of Dissemination, Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies (CHESS); a NIATx Coach; Regional State Coordinator for the Great Lakes Addiction Technology Transfer Center (GLATTC) based at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

J. Charles Ross, MSSA, LISW, PCC-S, LICDC, Trainer and “Coach” on Process Improvement for NIATx based out of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; Behavior Health Surveyor and Opioid Treatment Specialist with The Joint Commission, Chicago, IL

A5: Pharmaceutical Update: Addiction Treatment, Co-Occurring Disorders, And Pain Management

We will discuss the three guidelines for pharmacologic interventions for dual disorders (psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders). Medications used for the treatment of addiction and psychiatric disorders will be presented along with the possible interactions between psychiatric medications and substances of abuse. We will identify strategies for increasing medication adherence and decreasing substance use in individuals with dual disorders. Plan to attend this session if you are a nurse practitioner looking for pharmacology hours or if you want a complete understanding of the association of addiction and co-occurring disorders.

Kathleen A. Clegg, MD, Director, Public and Community Psychiatry, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH

A6: Ethics From A Legal Perspective (AM) / Supervision: Conceptualizing An Effective Approach (PM)

Ethics is the bridge between what is legal, and what is moral. Participants in this session will explore the dynamics of legally defensible supervision, and practice that stands up to ethics challenges. We will review legal and administrative rulings from Ohio and other states that demonstrate how things can go wrong, and we will review effective strategies that will minimize risk and liability for supervisors, and for clinicians.

The afternoon session will address conceptualizing an effective approach to supervision. This session will focus on addressing clinician non-compliance, disciplinary actions, team building processes and movement toward and documentation of disciplinary action processes.

**PLEASE NOTE: This session will be divided into an ethics section and a supervision section. We have requested three (3.25) hours of credit in each of the two areas to meet Ohio Social Work, Professional Counselor, and Marriage & Family Therapy credit. All other disciplines may use as deemed appropriate.

Doug Althauser, LICDC-CS, MAC, ICCS, CRC, Esq., Family and Youth Law Center at Capital University, Columbus, OH

Arianna Galligher, MSW, LISW-S, Clinical Manager, PHP/IOP Department, OSU Harding Hospital, Columbus, OH

A7: Operation: Street Smart

Operation: Street Smart provides current information on drug trends, terminology, paraphernalia, and physiological effects to those individuals who deal with youth on a daily basis. Over 25 different street drugs are covered with actual examples of each escorted throughout the audience for closer inspection by participants. Narcotics detectives with over 30 years combined undercover experience conduct this unique program. The session follows the national curriculum.

Captain Shawn Bain (Ret) and Sergeant Mike Powell (Ret), Franklin County Sheriff's Office, Columbus, OH

A8: Opioid Use And Abuse In The Context Of A Legal Drug Culture

We will begin with a description of our “legal drug culture” that has influenced the current drug epidemic. Included in this section is information of drug marketing in general, direct-to-consumer marketing (TV) and prescribing patterns. The history of opioid use starting in 3400 B.C. (opioid use not new) and continuing to the current time will be discussed. The effects of opioid addiction, attempts to modify prescribing practices and control access to opioids will demonstrate why the increase in heroin addiction as unintended consequences. The dangers of fentanyl and other analogues (e.g., carfentanil) will be discussed. Those people at higher risk for overdose will be identified. The opioid epidemic is not the result of any one thing but a set of interacting events that cannot be simply explained by any one event (e.g., physician overprescribing). The systems for overdose reversal, and how they save lives but do little alone to stem the opioid epidemic will be described and one potential solution offered. The inadequacy of psychosocial treatment alone for many opioid addicts will be discussed and the description of the current anti-addiction drugs for opioid dependence (methadone, Suboxone and Vivitrol), their similarities and differences, how they work and their role in conjunction with psychosocial treatment. Research results for all the anti-addiction medications will be presented.

Gerald Shulman, MA, MAC, FACATA, Trainer/Consultant, Shulman Training & Consulting In Behavioral Health, Jacksonville, FL

A9: Motivational Interviewing In Group Therapy

This session provides behavioral health counselors an opportunity to consider the potential impact of using Motivational Interviewing (MI) methods in facilitating counseling groups. The session includes brief instructional presentations, demonstrations, structured learning activities, and group facilitation skill practice, all within an MI framework. Clinicians who facilitate groups using a structured, manual-based format and those who utilize more process-focused methods will benefit equally from the workshop. It should be noted, however, that this session does not serve as a basic introduction to MI or to group facilitation. It is assumed that participants will have a basic understanding of MI and group facilitation.

John M. Ellis, LISW-S, LICDC-CS, ICCS, Professor and Addictions Curriculum Coordinator, School of Social Work, College of Health Professions, The University of Akron, Akron, OH

Russell Spieth, PhD, CRC, Senior Consultant/Trainer-Motivational Interviewing, Northeast Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH

A10: Addiction 101: A Primer In Addiction And Treatment

Relatively new to the field? For those just starting out or for seasoned professionals just beginning to work with substance abusers, this session provides a practical and straightforward overview of the substance abuse field. We will cover the physiology of addiction, genetic factors, thinking patterns, diagnosis and assessment, the recovery process, evidence-based treatment, and treatment planning. WARNING: This session does contain PowerPoint. But do not despair, there will be activities and opportunities to talk as well as listen.

Brad Lander, PhD, LICDC, Psychologist/Clinical Director, Talbot Hall, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH

Plenary Session
Thursday, 7/26/2018
8:00AM-10:00AM

Prescription Opioids and Pain

Description coming soon

Marvin D. Seppala, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and Serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies, Center City, MN

Concurrent Session B
Thursday, 7/26/2018
10:15AM-12:15PM

B1: COR-12: Linking Science And Recovery For Opioid Use Disorders

Description Coming Soon

Marvin D. Seppala, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and Serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Hazelden Graduate School of Addiction Studies, Center City, MN

B2: Priming: Using The Hidden Power Of Language For Superior Client Outcomes And Self-Improvement

Priming research of the last 20 years has determined that humans are controlled by an unconscious guidance system profoundly more than ever conceived. Priming occurs when something stimulates and triggers behavior. Semantic priming has confirmed the hidden power of words to stimulate preparatory thoughts that trigger new behavior with or without conscious awareness. The most significant finding is that unconsciously created goals can be equal or more powerful than conscious goals and, amazingly, that goals do not require an act of will to be acquired. Yet, the nuances of how new behaviors are stimulated through the precise, meticulous use of language are rarely discussed relative to the therapeutic dialogue. 

This dynamic, humorous presenter introduces the audience to a world of priming through a discussion of the priming that occurs in our everyday lives of which everyone can relate. It then addresses the scientific research, demonstrates the phenomena, and explains how priming should be utilized in the therapeutic dialogue. Ultimately, therapists are provided a linguistic tool that will radically intensify the impact of therapeutic communications and effectiveness. In addition, these principles provide you with the mental tools necessary for molding yourself into the person you want to be and for reaching personally desired goals.  

Clifton Mitchell, PhD, National Speaker and Professor Emeritus, Counseling Program, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

B3: Exploring Issues: Confronting The Substance Use Disorder Treatment Professional Working In A Criminal Justice Setting

Issues confront substance use disorder treatment professionals working in a criminal justice settings such as: criminogenic nature of clients, challenges from co-workers including treatment professionals and custody, and compliance of directives from administration. Learning how to identify and navigate these issues will not only determine the longevity of professional within criminal justice setting yet may impact their personal lives as well. The purpose of this session is to explore issues that SUD treatment professionals working in the criminal justice setting have in common with the idea of generating solutions to mitigate sources of stress and reduce recidivism. Solutions will be explored in the physical, cognitive, and social domains with an emphasis of reinvigorating clinical effectiveness. Primarily small group discussion and large group processing will be utilized to achieve the objectives of this session.

Brad Wise, MEd, LICDC-CS, Behavioral Healthcare Program Supervisor 2 – Regional Recovery Services Administrator, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, Columbus, OH

B4: Evolution Of Nursing Care To Effectively Treat Patients Struggling With Opioid Addiction

This session will explore the evolution of the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation nursing model—the need for the evolution, advancements and the focus on patient-centered care. The session will also discuss the importance of the nurses’ role on the integrated care team, developing cohesiveness and standardization across the organization, impact on quality of patient care, patient satisfaction scores and the development of specialized nursing roles for treating our patients struggling with opioid addiction.

Jill Seward, BSN, MSN(c), National Nursing Service Director/Chief Nursing Officer, Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, Center City, MN

B5: Putting The Pieces Together: Holistic Treatment For Co-Occurring Disorders

According to statistics, roughly half of individuals with severe mental disorders are affected by substance abuse. Furthermore, the presence of co-occurring disorders increases risk for poverty, illness, incarceration and homelessness. Strategies that integrate mental health and substance abuse services have been found to reduce criminal activity, psychiatric hospitalizations and crisis services and to increase family reunification and positive community involvement. This session will explore the relationship between mental illness and addiction and the importance of managing co-occurring disorders utilizing a holistic framework for sustained recovery. This first part of this session will identify signs and symptoms of common mental disorders and how disorders may serve as a barrier to recovery. The second portion of this session will serve to provide guidelines for completing a thorough integrated assessment utilizing the ASAM criteria, outline the development ofan integrated, measurable service plan, and identify a holistic framework of strategies to effectively treat co-occurring disorders.

Kristina Camden, LPCC-S, Clinical Director for Residential Programs, Mended Reeds Mental Health, Ironton, OH

David Sanders, MEd, LPCC-S, Assistant Director of Residential Programming, Mended Reeds Mental Health, Ironton, OH

B6: Emerging Trends For Treating Addictions Of Offenders In Jails And Community-Based Intervention Programs

We will examine the use of various treatment modalities in jail settings as well as community-based interventions. We will look at the effectiveness of using grants such as 21st Century Cures and OHMAS CJ Linkage grants to address barriers to recovery that hinder successful reintegration by offenders with SUDs. In addition to discussion of IOP groups in the jail, the effectiveness of linking offenders to groups such as Anger Management and Seeking Safety are explored as a means of addressing underlying factors prevalent among individuals with SUDs that have repeated contact with the criminal justice system. Incorporating peer recovery supporters at the jails, as first contacts when released, and as an ongoing connection to community recovery resources is considered. Active participation in special docket courts and intervention in lieu of conviction programs are analyzed. Presenters represent key members of the treatment team and include a clinical supervisor, an LSW/chemical dependency counselor, and an Ohio certified Peer Recovery Supporter.

Mary Wade-Jones, MSCJ, CDCAII, PRS, Bayshore Counseling Services, Sandusky, OH

Julie Groover, MCP, LPCC-S, Chemical Dependency Supervisor/Mental Health Therapist, Bayshore Counseling Services, Sandusky, OH

Angela Harris, MSW, LSW, Chemical Dependency Counselor, Bayshore Counseling Services, Sandusky, OH

B7: Let's Talk About Drugs: Pain Management In Substance Use Disorder

People with substance use disorder present many challenges for healthcare professionals who are faced with managing their acute and chronic pain conditions. People whose disorder is maintained on medication assisted treatment (MAT) with buprenorphine or methadone present unique pharmacological challenges as well. This session will focus on medications used for MAT and for pain management, the unique challenges of pain management in people with substance use disorder, and strategies for approaching acute or chronic pain management that promotes patient-centered care.

Justin Kullgren, PharmD, Pain and Palliative Medicine Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH

Maureen Saphire, PharmD, BCGP, CDP, Palliative Medicine Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center James Cancer Hospital, Columbus, OH

B8: Transgender Etiquette

Description Coming Soon

delfín w. bautista, MSW, MDiv, Director, LGBT Center and Adjunct Lecturer, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Ohio University, Athens, OH

B9: Status Of Recovery Definition And Measurement

Recovery has emerged as an important paradigm in addictions treatment but the field has yet to achieve consensus on how it should be defined. The recovery construct has been extended beyond sustained reductions in use or abstinence to enhancements in global health/well-being and also prosocial community reintegration. However, few studies have included these broader domains in their measurement of recovery and no scientific theory has been advanced to explain why reductions in substance use occasion these broader life changes. This session (a) draws on abstinence and remission data to paint a picture of the possible prevalence and course of recovery, (b) provides an overview of recovery concepts such as recovery capital, (c) details how an increased focus on recovery management might enhance outcomes, (d) reviews recent theory- and experience-based efforts to define and measure recovery, and (e) explores how the status of recovery definition and measurement raises calls into question our understanding of the prevalence and course of recovery, the validity of recovery concepts, and the potential utility of recovery management. We conclude with a discussion of future directions and challenges for recovery definition and measurement.

George Richardson, PhD, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Substance Abuse Counseling Program Track, Counseling Program, School of Human Services, College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH

B10: Community And Boundaries: Relationship Building In The Trauma-Informed Care Setting

A positive and helpful therapeutic relationship is one of the most important aspects of successful treatment. We have made strides in understanding the importance of connectivity to others to sustain recovery. We will discuss the importance of relationships within the Trauma Informed Care setting. During our time together, a previous client and clinician will share candidly from their own experiences of building connectivity in recovery. We will explore research and insights into developing helpful, positive relationships while maintaining boundaries. Together, we will look at the challenges of therapeutic relationships. We will discuss how to handle terminating relationships when necessary. Finally, we will discuss self-care and supervision as necessary measures within the therapeutic alliance

Mandi Pierson, LISW-S, Clinical Social Worker, Mount Carmel Crime and Trauma Assistance Program, Columbus, OH

B11: You're In The Driver's Seat: An Educational and Interactive Lesson For Clinicians In Drug And Alcohol Impaired Driving

Substance abuse affects almost every aspect of the lives of the substance-addicted individual. Treatment most often focuses on the toll addiction takes on family and friends without addressing a frequently overlooked consequence of addition, driving while impaired by drugs or alcohol and its impact on the public. Alcohol-related fatal crashes claimed 405 lives in Ohio in 2017, and the number of drug-related fatal crashes last year in several states exceeded fatalities due to alcohol. This two-hour educational and interactive session will give you a thorough understanding of alcohol and marijuana’s effect on decision making, coordination and reaction time and put you in the driver’s seat of an impaired driver. With the help of the American Court Services’ staff and scientifically engineered goggles, you’ll drive under the influence, attempt to pass a field sobriety test and experience first hand the consequences of impaired driving, all in a fun and safe environment.

William Parker, President and CEO, American Court & Drug Testing Services, Lancaster, OH

B12: TBA

Description Coming Soon

TBA

Lunch With The Expert
Thursday, 7/26/2018
12:30PM – 1:30PM

**(Additional fee required to cover lunch cost and participate - PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED - COST TO ATTEND WHICH INCLUDES LUNCH IS $28.00)**

P1: Medical Marijuana: Myths, Legalization, and Implications for Clinicians 

Description Coming Soon

TBA

Concurrent Session C
Thursday, 7/26/2018
1:45PM-5:00PM

C1: Smarter Than You Think: Adult Survivors Of Childhood Trauma & Dysfunctional Families, Using Social, Emotional And Spiritual Intelligences For Recovery

Child abuse, addiction and other trauma often do not end with childhood.  When childhood is over the survivors are adults.  Not all adult survivors become the walking wounded. Many are able to grow beyond the experience and develop resiliency skills using a strength-based model of recovery based on emotional, social and spiritual intelligences.. Resilience is the ability to thrive despite adversity and enables people of all ages and backgrounds to lead healthy and fulfilling lives despite formidable obstacles.  This workshop will focus on why adult victims of child abuse and other types of high risk families are not all the same and how many adults from high risk families have emerged as healthy and resilient while others continue to struggle.  Techniques for using emotional, social and spiritual intelligences in order to develop resiliency skills and behaviors will be presented. 

Robert Ackerman, PhD, Professor Emeritus and Previous Director, Mid-Atlantic Addiction Research and Training Institute; Co-Founder of the National Association for Children of Alcoholics; Chair of the Advisory Board and Former Editor of Counselor: The Magazine for Addiction and Behavioral Health Professionals, Hilton Head, SC

C2: Achieving Ethical Excellence: Remembering What You Forgot

Get your annual legal and ethical CE training in a dynamic format! This session is designed to test your legal and ethical knowledge! Management of some of the most perplexing legal and ethical quandaries will be explored. Topics include child abuse, confidentiality, duty to warn, elder abuse, HIPAA, noted legal cases, malpractice, and more. The material is applicable to all disciplines, practices, and states

Clifton Mitchell, PhD, National Speaker and Professor Emeritus, Counseling Program, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN

C3: Supervision Roundtable: Training Supervision Models And Best Practices

The Ohio Revised Code for Counselor and Social Workers defines "Training supervision" as supervision for the purposes of preparing supervisees to obtain a license and/or development of new areas of proficiency while providing services to clients. This session will present models, theory and best practices to advance the skill set of developing and more experienced training supervisors. Content will review models and theories that provide direction to the supervisee, to apply counseling and social work theory, standardized knowledge, skills, competency, and applicable ethical content in the practice setting.

Anderson Hawes, LPCC, LICDC, LSW, CEO/President/Therapist, Associates in Family Wellness, Cuyahoga Falls, OH

C4: Rural Addictions Treatment: Perspectives On Building Practice, Community & Resilience

We will explore rural culture including an overview of the unique challenges and strengths of rural healthcare practices. We will discuss best practice guidelines for substance use/abuse treatment (integrated, collaborative, holistic healthcare) and the importance of community collaborations and developing partnerships. Technology options including telemedicine, supervision, and electronic medical records and their application to rural addictions treatment will be discussed. Finally, we will identify ways to “get creative” as it relates to: resources, programming, partnerships, and workforce development – what can you implement in your home sites?

Kate Jiggins, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, Director, Medication Assisted Treatment Project, Hopewell Health Centers, Athens, OH

C5: Motivating Behavor Change In Others: The Influence Of Our Values And Perceptions...It Starts With Us

We will introduce participants to the philosophical roots and essential constructs to understanding motivating behavior change. Participants will engage in reflective exercises and dialogue designed to assist them in uncovering personal and professional expectations that influence how they relate to others. Participants will be introduced to the Engaging process and learn skill-building exercises designed to assist them in utilizing person-centered approaches and engage people in change discussions. Signs of disengagement (“Common Traps”) will be identified that create barriers to motivating change. We will discuss client-centered approaches and strategies for responding to resistance in clinical settings for individuals with behavioral and physical health conditions, including mental health and/or substance use disorders. The Center for Evidence-Based Practices makes an attempt to incorporate exercises and examples specific to the unique practice settings of participants, with an emphasis on individuals with severe and persistent mental illness and/or substance use disorders

Scott Gerhard, MA, LISW, Consultant/Trainer, Center for Evidence Based Practices, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

C6: Addictions Practice With Latinos: Recognizing And Overcoming Barriers To Effective And Ethical Cross-Cultural Work

With the growing US Latino population, non-Latino professionals must become culturally competent in order to effectively and ethically work with Latino clients. This panel session will address barriers to effective work with Latinos; the importance of language, culture, and worldview; ethical dilemmas; and best practices and evidence-based interventions for work with the Latino community. Panelists include a Latino clinician/community leader, a non-Latino addictions researcher, a Latino manager of treatment services, and a Latino social work student. They will provide insight and narratives based on their own ethnic and cultural perspectives, and their work with the Latino community.

Louis Guardiola MSW, LSW, LICDC, Lecturer/Field Director, BSW and MSW Program, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH

C7: Maximizing Partnership Opportunities Between Child Welfare And Addiction Treatment

This session focuses upon the opportunities for addiction treatment agencies to develop partnerships with child welfare agencies. These partnerships can create a process of establishing goals that greatly improves access, compliance, and success in treatment. Participants will be introduced to a model of intervention that addresses the unique needs of the child welfare client, while learning of the opportunities presented by the extraordinary skills of child welfare workers to improve treatment outcomes.

Ed Hughes MPS, LICDC-CS, Owner, Hughes Consulting, LLC, Consultant, Institute for Human Services, Portsmouth, OH

C8: Building Resilient Teams

Supervising and leading intensive treatment teams in the changing behavioral health landscape can prove challenging. Intentional leadership and supervision are critical elements in creating resiliency on intensive treatment teams. The resilience of a team is based upon a planful process for building healthy cohesive team environments, supervising team members around the necessary skills and knowledge needed to provide recovery-oriented service delivery, effective transition management strategy and on-going professional growth through competency based evaluation and succession planning. This session will explore the qualities necessary and the considerations that supervisors and leaders make concerning clinical/administrative supervision and leadership essentials involved in sustaining an intensive treatment team. The workshop will include interactive activities to promote application of the training content into relevant practice. This is part of a series of ongoing workshops developed and presented by The Center for Evidence Based Practices at Case Western Reserve University aimed to help develop and enhance administrative and clinical leadership and supervision.

Deana Leber-George, MEd, LPCC-S, Consultant/Trainer, Center for Evidence-Based Practices, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

C9: TBA

Description Update in Progress

 

C10: Not Mother's Little Helper: Providing Effective Counseling With Clients In MAT Programs

This session is intended to provide practical guidance for counselors working with clients who are engaged in MAT programs. The appropriate and effective use of MAT is not always well understood or implemented because the fundamental theoretical base and how it informs the overall treatment process has not been reviewed. This can lead to gaps in the process and practice of the therapist resulting in too great a reliance on medication and lack of focus on the multi-dimensional changes in the individual necessary to sustain recovery. The overall structure and dynamics of addiction treatment will be reviewed with attention to how incorporating MAT protocols/clients will influences the process and techniques used in the treatment process.

Brad Price, PhD, PC, LICDC-CS, Counselor, Townhall II, Kent, OH; Therapist, Copley Counseling Center, Boardman, OH; and Fully Affiliated Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling, Methodist Theological School in Ohio, Delaware, OH

C11: TBA

TBA

TBA

Plenary Session
Friday, 7/27/2018
8:00AM-10:00AM

The Rationale And Science Of Recovery Services

During the past 50 years of addressing substance use disorders in the U.S. the field has moved from acute care models, to relapse prevention, and now to chronic disease management . This paradigm shift has occurred as more has been learned about the long-term clinical and recovery course for those suffering form these conditions. This talk describes the shift from the “War on drugs” toward broad public health models in addressing addiction and describes the rationale and need for addressing addiction as a chronic condition from which most people will eventually recover. The latest research evidence on long-term recovey support models will be presented.

John Kelley, PhD, Elizabeth R. Spallin Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the Field of Addiction Medicine, Harvard Medical School & Founder and Director of the Recovery Research Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

Concurrent Session D
Friday, 7/27/2018
10:15AM-12:15PM

D1: Marijuana Policy, Treatment, and Recovery

The policy landscape regarding the use of cannabis for “medical” and recreational purposes is shifting quickly in the US and internationally. This has meant the brith of a growing industry, new jobs, and new tax revenues, but also brings greater Increased population exposure to a substance that can produce addiction, as well as intoxication and toxicity related harms. This talk descrbes the pros and cons of different policy position on cannabis ranging from prohibition to full commercialization and describes the harms that can occur as a result of increased availability, accessibility, lower prices, and higher potency. Research on prevalence, treatment, and recovery will be presented.

John Kelley, PhD, Elizabeth R. Spallin Associate Professor of Psychiatry in the Field of Addiction Medicine, Harvard Medical School & Founder and Director of the Recovery Research Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

D2: Meeting The Addiction Treatment Needs Of Active Duty And Military Veterans: Identifying Gaps, Needs, And The Appropriate Tailored Services

This session will discuss the design and delivery of services to active duty military members, military veterans, and their loved ones. Individuals with military experience often present to treatment with a different array of strengths and needs, and more often than not, a different array of treatment barriers. This clinical presentation requires services designed specifically for the population, and providers who are culturally competent in working with both the client and the systems that support their recovery. Information will be provided to assist clinicians in ensuring that we are able to do our best for the men and women who have sacrificed so much for us.

Stephen Lloyd, MD, Medical Director, Journey Pure at the River, Murfreesboro, TN; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, James H Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN; Former Commissioner for Substance Abuse Services, Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Nashville, TN

D3: Addiction: A Behavioral Economic Perspective

Why do people often behave in ways that are known to have dire consequences for their long-term health and well-being? The challenge of addiction is to understand how and why addicts are so insensitive to the future consequences of their drug-seeking behavior. Even more challenging is the understanding of why this same choice is repeatedly made with the negative consequences. Why they begin, why they persist, and why they relapse? An understanding what drives these decisions is a critical part of prevention and treatment of addiction. How do we best motivate individuals to act according to with their long-term goals? To promote desirable behavior requires an understanding of human behavior.

The purpose of this session is to provide an understanding of these three questions about the stages of addiction: initial use, compulsive use, and relapse. The main idea in this presentation is that addiction is a consequence of falling victim to decision failures that lead to the preference for the addictive behaviors. That is, addiction is viewed as valuation disease, where the nervous system overvalues cues associated with drugs or drug-taking. This presentation provides a perspective from behavioral economics to account for self-defeating behaviors and design ways to prevent these adverse outcomes.

Shahram Heshmat, PhD, Adjunct Faculty, Department of Public Health, Benedictine University and Expert Blogger for Psychology Today writing The Science of Choice: Looking at Addiction as a Decision-Making Disorder, Evanston, IL

D4: Pain Management In The Palliative Care Setting During An Opioid Epidemic

Palliative care and hospice programs are known for an interdisciplinary approach to symptom management for patients with severe or life-limiting disease. Addiction, medication assisted treatment (MAT), and addiction recovery alters traditional methods of symptom management in these programs and patient populations. This session will highlight clinical pearls to manage pain and other select symptoms in patients with severe or life-limiting diseases whom are addicted, enrolled in medication assisted treatment (MAT) programs, or in recovery. In reflection of the opioid epidemic, palliative care and hospice programs have an obligation to treat symptoms, manage addiction, and maintain recovery.

Stacy Rexrode, PharmD, BCGP, Owner and Clinical Consultant, Jude Rx, LLC, Dublin, OH

D5: The Wounded Griever: Grief Competency In Addiction Counselors

The session addresses counseling skills regarding the grief process, experiences of loss, and the realities of death. The presentation addresses how grief, loss, and the understanding of fears related to death can complicate both the onset and maintenance of addiction recovery; and can present challenges for the counselor due to his or her unexpressed grief. Learning objectives include: analyzing how grief interacts with substance use, addiction recovery, and relapse; explaining dynamics contributing to unexpressed or long-term grief; delineating the roles of resolution and acceptance in the grieving process; and examining the value of utilizing a Grief Graph. Attendees will be challenged to examine any personal process that could be interfering with clinical work regarding grief.

David Chastain, PhD, CSAC, Assistant Professor, Hazelden Betty Ford Graduate School of Addiction Studies, Center City, MN

D6: Addiction, Incarceration, And The Need For Treatment And On-Going Recovery Support

The presenter will provide an overview of the progressive nature of addiction, criminal behavior, and eventual involvement with the criminal justice system. We will also discuss the ability for some people to change through treatment and recovery support involvement while incarcerated. The presenter will provide an overview of services offered by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Correctional Recovery Services to offenders incarcerated in Ohio followed by an overview of the importance of the transition from prison to the community. The need for treatment prior to release, possibly after, and the need for ongoing recovery support along with strategies to reduce recidivism will be discussed.

Lamont Sapp, MSCJ, LICDC-CS, Regional Recovery Services Administrator, Ohio Mental Health and Addiction Services, SW Region, State of Ohio, Columbus, OH

D7: Making The Case For Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)

ACT is an intensive program model in which a multidisciplinary team of professionals serves people who do not readily use clinic-based services, but who are often at high risk for psychiatric hospitalization. ACT teams have a holistic approach to services, help with medications, housing, finances, employment, and everyday problems in living, with most contact occurring in community settings. ACT differs from traditional case management approaches both conceptually and empirically, being one of the best-researched mental health treatment models. ACT shows substantial impact in many important areas of recovery, is highly successful in engaging patients in treatment, and is cost effective. This session will help “make the case” for implementing ACT in community practice.

Scott Gerhard, MA, LISW, Consultant/Trainer, Center for Evidence-Based Practices, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

D8: Considerations For Treating Addiction In Women During The Reproductive Years

We will discuss the general differences between men and women with respect to substance abuse. Next we will explore special considerations in treating substance abusing women of childbearing age and discuss the effects of specific substances of abuse on maternal, fetal, and neonatal well-being. In addition, we will review the general recommendations for treating substance abuse during pregnancy and examine recommendations for treatment of specific substances of abuse during pregnancy.

Casia Horseman, MD, Psychiatrist, Talbot Hall, OSU Hospital East, Columbus, OH

D9: You Can Lead A Horse To Water...Equine Assisted Psychotherapy and Recovery (Session will be repeated during E9)

Those who are familiar with horses recognize and understand the power of horses to influence people in incredibly powerful ways. But can observing and interacting on the ground with horses foster recovery from substance use or mental illness? According to research the answer is “yes.” Equine Assisted Psychotherapy is an experiential modality of mental health treatment. The EAGALA (Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association) Model involves activities with horses which provide opportunities for the client or group to gain insights and apply new learning and skills. EAP offers those in treatment and recovery immediate feedback, opportunities for learning, opportunities for building trust and the ability to demonstrate healthy relationships. Plan to attend this session and see the horses in a live demonstration of equine therapy techniques.

Joanne Thompson, MSEd, LPCC, Equine Assisted Psychotherapist, Serenity Stables Therapeutic Learning Center, Galena, OH

D10: HIPPA & 42CFR

Description coming soon

TBA

D11: You're In The Driver's Seat: An Educational and Interactive Lesson For Clinicians In Drug And Alcohol Impaired Driving

Substance abuse affects almost every aspect of the lives of the substance-addicted individual. Treatment most often focuses on the toll addiction takes on family and friends without addressing a frequently overlooked consequence of addition, driving while impaired by drugs or alcohol and its impact on the public. Alcohol-related fatal crashes claimed 405 lives in Ohio in 2017, and the number of drug-related fatal crashes last year in several states exceeded fatalities due to alcohol. This two-hour educational and interactive session will give you a thorough understanding of alcohol and marijuana’s effect on decision making, coordination and reaction time and put you in the driver’s seat of an impaired driver. With the help of the American Court Services’ staff and scientifically engineered goggles, you’ll drive under the influence, attempt to pass a field sobriety test and experience first hand the consequences of impaired driving, all in a fun and safe environment.

William Parker, President and CEO, American Court & Drug Testing Services, Lancaster, OH

 

Education Session - Lunch Not Provided
Friday, 7/27/2018
12:30PM – 1:30PM

**There is NOT a fee to attend this session but you MUST PRE-REGISTER. CEUs will be available for this session.

P2: New CDCA Supervision Rules and New Upgrades to eLicense

The Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board will provide an overview of the CDCA Supervision Rules and the newest updates to the eLicense system.   Participants will learn the CDC Supervision Rule language, answers to frequently asked questions, and practical strategies on how to successfully navigate the application process.    

This session is designed for Institute attendees that are either licensed under the Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board or individuals that plan to apply for licensure.  Continuing education units will be given for this only by the OCDPB and not any of the other licensing boards.  This is a great chance to learn about changes and meet the new Executive Director.

This session is offered during the lunch break but lunch will not be served.

Alisia Clark, Executive Director, Ohio Chemical Dependency Professionals Board, Columbus, OH
 

Concurrent Session E
Friday, 7/27/2018
1:45PM-4:00PM

E1: Addiction In Appalachia: Current Trends And Possible Solutions

The opioid epidemic appears to have made its greatest impact within the Appalachian region of the United States. News stories appear on almost a daily basis showing the devastation this has had on some of our most vulnerable citizens. Statistics documenting overdose rates, use rates, opioid access, and neonatal abstinence syndrome rates are astounding. Information on how we got into this current mess will be presented, along with a discussion of current trends in use and service needs---including a recent reemergence of methamphetamine in this region. Possible solutions to this epidemic will be discussed at both the individual and community level, with specific suggestions for working with the needs and assets of individuals presenting for treatment from this area, and what services are needed to support long-term recovery.

Stephen Lloyd, MD, Medical Director, Journey Pure at the River, Murfreesboro, TN; Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, James H Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN; Former Commissioner for Substance Abuse Services, Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Nashville, TN

E2: The Intersection Between Drugs And Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is the second-leading criminal enterprise in the United States and worldwide. Its growth is attributable to several factors, including the expansion of social media and the internet and most countries' failure to enact laws that fully address the issues related to trafficking. One major factor that has caused exponential growth in the number of human-trafficking victims is the increasing number of drug addictions reported in Ohio and across the country. Drug addictions intersect with the crime of human trafficking in many ways. This presentation will address the ways that the drug crisis has enabled human traffickers to more easily recruit and control their victims. We will also discuss the "red flags" of human trafficking and how service providers can best intervene to provide necessary assistance. Finally, we will discuss required changes that must be made to our legislative and policy framework to address this growing crisis.

Maureen Guirguis (Kenny), JD, Co-Founder and Co-Director, Human Trafficking Law Clinic, Case Western Reserve University School of Law, Cleveland, OH

E3: Client Interaction Training

The Client Interaction Training is designed to empower counselors with tidbits, tricks and tips to help them navigate client engagement during challenging sessions/home visits, i.e. a client who is verbally abusive, a client who is disengaged or a client who is hallucinating, etc. while maintaining worker’s emotional and physical safety. This is not an ethics, a counseling 101, or a self-defense course. The verbal skills learned or reminded of during this training are valuable and could be the difference between burnout and compassion satisfaction. This highly engaging training will be fun and hopes to leave professionals feeling energized and confident in their work.

Angie Giltner, MSOL, LSW, LCDC-III, GAL, President, Empower Training & Assessment Co., LLC, Wooster, OH

E4: Understanding The Cycle Of Anger And Addiction

A therapist once said, "If you cannot learn to manage your emotions; you will never learn to manage your addiction." Addiction is a complex and challenging problem in our society today. This session will provide an understanding of how emotions including anger and addiction are tied together. Methods for treating anger and substance use disorders will be provided. 

Henry Griffin, Jr., MSEd, LPCC, LCADC, Partial Hospitalization Program Supervisor; Manager Adolescent Recovery Center; AOD Therapist, Communicare, Inc., Elizabeth, KY

E5: Reaching Peers Where They Are: Emerging Trends

Many are working to bridge the gaps in behavioral health recovery while being diverse & inclusive. Peer coaches work to provide programming in a holistic way that promotes recovery. This workshop will demonstrate ways that staff can provide recovery services through technology, wellness and arts programs. We know that peers are connected in a variety of ways, however not all peers are culturally sensitive to what other peers needs are. This workshop will establish ways to encourage and engage peer recovery coaches to be diversified in programming as well as culturally sensitive through role-playing and a discussion on the do's and don'ts of working with various demographics. We will also discuss how different recovery programming will reach peers where they are at and can fulfill what their needs may be in recovery.

Andrew Davis, MSEd, LPCC-S, Signature Psychiatry Associates, Akron, OH

Jody Morgan, CHHC, PS-MH, Akron, OH

E6: Manipulation Techniques In SUD's: The Why And Working Through With Compassion

Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) are often difficult to treat due to the inherent qualities of the disease of addiction, including the addictive habit of self-preserving manipulation. People in early recovery or active addiction can often be manipulative of close relationships, including the helping relationship. Manipulation can be outward, such as monopolizing group time or denying the results of a drug test, or tactics can also be discrete; for example, vilifying the counselor (or other support person) and rationalizing. This creates a barrier for the counselor, as attempts are made to create a congruent and accepting relationship, which often can unknowingly perpetuate manipulative habits. Research and training in this area is minimal, and oftentimes new counselors (or counselors new to the field of SUDs) miss important opportunities to join with a client in an effective manner. During this presentation, examples will be given of common manipulation tactics used in group and individual settings, as well as tools to overcome each of these tactics. We will also review the underlying process that promotes manipulation techniques in individuals with SUDs and how clinicians can see this as part of the recovery process.

Deanna England, LICDC-CS, LPC, NCC, Clinical Manager of Treatment Services, Oriana House, Inc., Akron, OH

E7: 21st Century CURES Funding For Rapid Access To Medication-Assisted Treatment & Recovery Support

This session provides a comprehensive overview of how a rural Federally Qualified Healthcare Center has used 21st Century CURES funding to develop and implement rapid access to medication-assisted treatment and recovery support services for people with opiate use disorder. Understand the unique needs and challenges of people in very early recovery. Learn about the mechanics of the program, the importance of creativity, and engaging community partners. Hear from rapid access and recovery support providers about their everyday experiences; learn about models and techniques; and hear about innovative collaborations they have developed in their communities. Plan to walk away from this session with some ‘how to’ knowledge about implementing similar strategies in your home sites, including building integrated healthcare teams, workforce training, and supervision.

Kate Jiggins, LPCC-S, LICDC-CS, Director, Medication Assisted Treatment Project, Hopewell Health Centers, Athens, OH

E8: Chemical Addictions: What About Family Members

There are many avenues for treatment of addicts and alcoholics, but very few that focus on the treatment of the other family members who are traumatized by a loved one's addictive lifestyle. In this session we will focus on the trauma experienced by addict/alcoholic families, and we will focus on some proven strategies and techniques counselors and other professionals can use to help family members not only cope with the trauma affecting their family unit but also grow personally because of it.

Robert Bailor, LPC, LICDC, Professional Counselor, Columbus, OH

E9: You Can Lead A Horse To Water...Equine Assisted Psychotherapy and Recovery (Session will be repeated during E9)

Those who are familiar with horses recognize and understand the power of horses to influence people in incredibly powerful ways. But can observing and interacting on the ground with horses foster recovery from substance use or mental illness? According to research the answer is “yes.” Equine Assisted Psychotherapy is an experiential modality of mental health treatment. The EAGALA (Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association) Model involves activities with horses which provide opportunities for the client or group to gain insights and apply new learning and skills. EAP offers those in treatment and recovery immediate feedback, opportunities for learning, opportunities for building trust and the ability to demonstrate healthy relationships. Plan to attend this session and see the horses in a live demonstration of equine therapy techniques.

Joanne Thompson, MSEd, LPCC, Equine Assisted Psychotherapist, Serenity Stables Therapeutic Learning Center, Galena, OH

E10: You're In The Driver's Seat: An Educational and Interactive Lesson For Clinicians In Drug And Alcohol Impaired Driving

Substance abuse affects almost every aspect of the lives of the substance-addicted individual. Treatment most often focuses on the toll addiction takes on family and friends without addressing a frequently overlooked consequence of addition, driving while impaired by drugs or alcohol and its impact on the public. Alcohol-related fatal crashes claimed 405 lives in Ohio in 2017, and the number of drug-related fatal crashes last year in several states exceeded fatalities due to alcohol. This two-hour educational and interactive session will give you a thorough understanding of alcohol and marijuana’s effect on decision making, coordination and reaction time and put you in the driver’s seat of an impaired driver. With the help of the American Court Services’ staff and scientifically engineered goggles, you’ll drive under the influence, attempt to pass a field sobriety test and experience first hand the consequences of impaired driving, all in a fun and safe environment.

William Parker, President and CEO, American Court & Drug Testing Services, Lancaster, OH

E11: Promoting Skillfulness In Motivational Interviewing As A Learning Community

How can learning motivational interviewing (MI) continue after attending a workshop? We describe a biweekly MI Learning Community that meets in one counseling program and is in its third year of operation. It is a form of peer supervision designed to promote ongoing MI skill development. We describe logistics, skill-building activities, coding practice interviews, and how interviewing simulated clients can foster MI skillfulness. Sample audio recordings and coded transcripts will be shared, attendees will practice in simulated MI Learning Communities, and recommendations will be provided for establishing and maintaining an MI Learning Community.

Cynthia Osborn, PhD, Professor, Counselor Education and Supervision (CES) Program, School of Lifespan Development and Educational Sciences, College of Education, Health and Human Services, Kent State University, Kent, OH

Annaleise Lessick, MEd, LPC, CDCA, Doctoral Student, Kent State University, Kent, OH